How Not to Hit the Ball Straight

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By admin December 30, 2014 00:43

Written by Al Geiberger

Fading and drawing the ball are skills every good golfer should have. The modifications required to hit these shots are surprisingly very simple. Just keep in mind that the funda¬mentals, which apply to a normal shot, apply as well to these shots. To hit the fade — to move the ball from left to right — aim your clubface at the target, then open your stance and your hip and shoulder align¬ment setting your body a bit to the left. Now make your normal swing, the path of which will follow your body alignment. The only swing change you make is that you “hold on” a little more through the impact area and ¬you keep the back of the left hand firmer going more toward the target instead of releasing and rotating as it would in a normal shot.

If you want to draw the ball — moving the ball right to left — your setup and swing action will be just the opposite. Close your stance and body alignment a bit, drawing your right foot a few inches back from the line and aligning your body accordingly. Keep your clubface aimed at the target. As you swing, be sure you stay behind the ball with your upper body so you will swing on the inside-to-out path your body alignment has dictated. This time you want to make a full release, an accentuated rotation of the hands and forearms as you swing through impact.

There are some teachers and players who advocate changing the grip to effect a fade or draw. My personal belief is that a grip adjustment is more awkward than changing your setup, and the sense of discomfort that results could interfere with your swing fundamentals. l like to keep it as simple as possible, so leave the grip alone.
Al Geiberger compiled 21 PGA and Champions Tour wins, including the 1966 PGA Championship. His best selling book TEMPO is available at your favorite bookstore.

Now make your normal swing, the path of which will follow your body alignment. The only swing change you make is that you “hold on” a little more through the impact area and ¬you keep the back of the left hand firmer going more toward the target instead of releasing and rotating as it would in a normal shot.

If you want to draw the ball — moving the ball right to left — your setup and swing action will be just the opposite. Close your stance and body alignment a bit, drawing your right foot a few inches back from the line and aligning your body accordingly. Keep your clubface aimed at the target. As you swing, be sure you stay behind the ball with your upper body so you will swing on the inside-to-out path your body alignment has dictated. This time you want to make a full release, an accentuated rotation of the hands and forearms as you swing through impact.

There are some teachers and players who advocate changing the grip to effect a fade or draw. My personal belief is that a grip adjustment is more awkward than changing your setup, and the sense of discomfort that results could interfere with your swing fundamentals. l like to keep it as simple as possible, so leave the grip alone.
Al Geiberger compiled 21 PGA and Champions Tour wins, including the 1966 PGA Championship. His best selling book TEMPO is available at your favorite bookstore.

admin
By admin December 30, 2014 00:43