BOOSTING MEN’S CARDIAC HEALTH

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By admin May 18, 2015 17:19

HEALTH & FITNESS

 Heart

BOOSTING MEN’S CARDIAC HEALTH

 The chances are, unfortunately, you know of someone or heard of someone dying on a golf course of cardiac arrest. Heart attacks in the U.S. account for 1 in 4 deaths of men of all ages and the U.S. spends $444 billion annually on heart disease.

 

Fortunately, preventative measures can be taken to reduce the risk of heart-related fatalities. “New research shows how simple moves can boost men’s cardiac health,” wrote Alexandra Sifferlin in TIME (May 18, 2015). Here we highlight the seven scientifically supported actions Sifferlin recommended:

 

  1. LIMIT THE BINGE WATCHING. Spending two to three hours a day watching TV is linked to a greater risk for cardiovascular disease.
  2. UNPLUG THE PHONE. The sound of a ringing cell phone can increase a person’s blood pressure.
  3. DON’T GO IT ALONE. People who live alone are more likely to die from a heart attack, stroke or other heart-related problem than those who live with others. If you’re not a people person, an American Heart Association panel also concluded that owning a pet may lower the risk of heart disease.
  4. LISTEN TO MUSIC. A study found that listening to music for just 30 minutes lowered aortic stiffness and circulatory-system pulse waves, both positive for heart function. Nice to know, the results held true whether people listened to classical music or rock.
  5. EAT CERTAIN UNEXPECTED FOODS. Beets and much maligned potato are high in potassium, which is important for blood pressure control. Peanuts may lower the risk of heart disease too.
  6. STOP SNORING. Snoring could signal problems in the carotid arteries, which supply oxygenated blood to the brain. Linked to sleep apnea, which can increase the risk for high blood pressure, heart attack and stroke.
  7. RELAX ALREADY. You’ve heard it before and you’ll hear it again. De-stressing through yoga or meditation can be heart protective. One study showed those scoring high in mindfulness were 86% more likely to have healthy hearts. Frequent saunas can help too.

 

Information provided in GolfNews Magazine including the Health & Fitness Section is for educational purposes only and is not medical advice. For medical advice, consult your medical practitioner.

 

 

admin
By admin May 18, 2015 17:19